Pope Francis and the Duggars

Originally posted on the theological beard:

I’m not really clued in to pop culture. I was vaguely aware of a show about a family with 19 children, and didn’t even know that the number was 19. So when a student told me about the scandal surrounding the Duggars this past Friday, I didn’t know what she was talking about. I mistakenly thought Josh Duggar was the father and that this had happened recently. Since then I have learned more about this particular scandal. What strikes me (though it does not surprise me) is how condemnatory people’s reactions toward Josh have been. It also drove home how much we truly do need to listen to Pope Francis. The people who condemn Josh and the Duggars in general are the same people who incessantly quote Pope Francis’s, “Who am I to judge,” in defense of homosexual acts. The problem is that these people never bothered to learn what the…

View original 829 more words

The Scapular Promise of Eternal Life

Originally posted on the theological beard:

Simon-Stock-16May2015

Today marks the 750th anniversary of the death of St. Simon Stock to whom our Lady gave the Scapular with this promise: “Take this Scapular, it shall be a sign of salvation, a protection in danger and a pledge of peace. Whosoever dies wearing this Scapular shall not suffer eternal fire.” This is quite a promise. (It is also not alone among the great promises made by our Mother and our Lord). It also, unfortunately, is misunderstood by many people. There is a temptation to treat the Scapular like a superstition. One may think something along the lines of this: “If I’m wearing these two little brown squares when I die, I’ll not go to hell. It is guaranteed.” But the Scapular is not a talisman and grace is not magic. While the grace of God is free, there is no compulsion in our cooperation with it. To properly understand the Scapular…

View original 209 more words

Benedictine nuns make their home on the range

Originally posted on CNS top stories:

Sister Maria Walburga Schortemeyer, ranch manager at the Abbey of St. Walburga, reaches out to a calf in a pasture near the abbey in Virginia Dale, Colo. Along with running the ranch, the community of 24 Benedictine nuns also maintains a retreat house for individuals and groups who wish to spend one or more days in prayer and contemplation. (CNS/Jim West) Sister Maria Walburga Schortemeyer, ranch manager at the Abbey of St. Walburga, reaches out to a calf in a pasture near the abbey in Virginia Dale, Colo. Along with running the ranch, the community of 24 Benedictine nuns also maintains a retreat house for individuals and groups who wish to spend one or more days in prayer and contemplation. (CNS/Jim West)

By Jim West Catholic News Service

VIRGINIA DALE, Colo. (CNS) — Sister Maria Walburga Schortemeyer is at home wading through the mud and manure of a barnyard in boots, work pants, a fleece jacket, and her white veil.

Minutes later, in the black-and-white habit of a Benedictine nun, she is equally at home singing psalms and praying the Divine Office in a chapel with other nuns.

Sister Maria Walburga is the ranch manager at the Abbey of St. Walburga in Virginia Dale. The town sits in the arid and…

View original 662 more words

Saints and Caesar

Originally posted on the theological beard:

While we render unto Caesar what is Caesar’s, this does not mean that there are aspects of secular life which are not informed by the Christian faith. Every aspect of secular life is informed by Christian faith because every aspect of secular life is inseparable from the human person created in the image and likeness of God and enlivened by His Spirit. Unfortunately, so often today faith is not seen informing social issues, but social issues informing faith. This rears its ugly head in varied ways. Sometimes it is wholly obvious. For instance, when a homosexualist reduces God’s holy word to merely human so that they may justify rejecting it. Often times it is much more subtle. An example of this comes from Bishop Terence Drainey of Middlesbrough. On May 1, the Feast of St. Joseph the Worker, he spoke of the dignity of work and the serious problem…

View original 322 more words

“Music was better back then”: When do we stop keeping up with popular music?

Originally posted on Skynet & Ebert:

After sixty years of research, it’s conventional wisdom: as people get older, they stop keeping up with popular music. Whether the demands of parenthood and careers mean devoting less time to pop culture, or just because they’ve succumbed to good old-fashioned taste freeze, music fans beyond a certain age seem to reach a point where their tastes have “matured”.

That’s why the organizers of the Super Bowl — with a median viewer age of 44 —  were smart to balance their Katy Perry-headlined halftime show with a showing by Missy Elliott.

Missy don't brag, she mostly boast Missy don’t brag, she mostly boast

Spotify listener data offers a sliced & diced view of each user’s streams. This lets us measure when this effect begins, how quickly the effect develops, and how it’s impacted by demographic factors.

For this study, I started with individual listening data from U.S. Spotify users and combined that…

View original 1,228 more words

Active Participation in the Liturgy: Misunderstood, and Full of Love

Originally posted on Walking The Way of Beauty:

Fr. Bob Robeson, Rector of Bishop Bruté, celebrates Mass during Lent. Fr. Bob Robeson, Rector of Bishop Bruté, celebrates Mass during Lent.

Here is my paper that I wrote for Moral Theology on how the Roman Canon (Euchristic Prayer I) leads us to love how Christ loves. I also discuss how Active Participation (though somewhat misinterpreted after the council) in the Liturgy is most closely related to the Eucharistic Prayer. (A Benedict XVI/Cardinal Ratzinger idea)

I REALLY enjoyed writing this and was very pleased with the “A” grade and how the paper turned out. Check it out and let me know what you think.

Written for Dr. Matthew Sherman’s Fundamental Moral Theology class at Marian University on 4-13-15:

Active Participation in the Eucharistic Prayer leads us to love as Christ loves. 

The life of a Christian is one thirsting for and seeking after truth. Pope Benedict XVI said, “The human person finds his perfection “in seeking and loving what is true…

View original 1,773 more words

Atrocities show need to strengthen dialogue with Muslims, Vatican says

dvora072096:

If you disagree with the headline, don’t dismiss the idea until you read the article.

Originally posted on CNS top stories:

Pakistanis protest after a Christian couple was burned alive for alleged blasphemy in November. (CNS/EPA) Pakistanis protest after a Christian couple was burned alive for alleged blasphemy in November. (CNS/EPA)

By Laura Ieraci Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY (CNS) — The Vatican said interreligious dialogue with the Muslim community must be strengthened given “the barbarism underway” by terrorists claiming to be Muslims.

The statement, issued by the Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue, comes after hundreds of Christians have been killed in recent months, often barbarically, by Islamist extremist groups in the Middle East, Libya, Nigeria, Kenya and several other African nations. Most recently, more than 20 Ethiopian Christians were killed by Islamic State militants in Libya. Thousands of other Christians in war-torn regions have been run out of their homes by Islamist groups.

View original 289 more words

Carmelites mark St. Teresa of Avila’s birth

Originally posted on The Record Newspaper:

Carmelite Sisters who are cloistered on Newburg Road sang vespers on March 30 in their enclosed chapel, which is separated from the main sanctuary of their chapel by metal bars. The prioress gave permission for this rare photo. (Record Photo by Marnie McAllister) Carmelite Sisters who are cloistered on Newburg Road sang vespers on March 30 in their enclosed chapel, which is separated from the main sanctuary of their chapel by metal bars. The prioress gave permission for this rare photo. (Record Photo by Marnie McAllister)

By Marnie McAllister, Record Editor

Nestled beside St. Agnes Church and School, the Carmelite Monastery at 1740 Newburg Road blends into the brick facades that line this busy stretch of road. Carpooling families and Highlands dwellers zip by at all hours rushing from one commitment to the next.

In contrast, behind the pale orange bricks, eight women religious — members of the Order of Discalced Carmelites — have only one commitment. They live a quiet, intense life of prayer in the tradition of St. Teresa of Avila, the 16th century Spanish mystic and Doctor of the Church.

On March 28, the nuns celebrated the 500th birthday of…

View original 874 more words